Month: May 2015

Peony Planning

Ever since we moved to the country, I feel like I’m constantly having to think two steps ahead. Do we need milk while I’m still in town? Does everyone have their medicine? Do we have toilet paper? Do I need to pick up something for dinner? I feel like it’s that way with our farm too. We’re still in the infant stages of our business, yet we are already thinking about fall and next year….AND three years down the line. While our annuals are growing each day, we’re planning out what our perennials should be. Which brings us to peonies.  Peonies are an expensive investment that will create a return in….THREE YEARS.  It takes three years for a peony to get its stuff together to produce anything.  Probably a lot like that recent college graduate who’s living in your basement right now.  Just kidding, I don’t know any of those types of people.  Who am I kidding, yes I do, and you do too. So we took a break from our normal hard-working weekend to do some homework. We took a lightning …

Wealth of Knowledge

I am currently reading The Lean Startup by Eric Ries. I’m only half way through it, but Eric stresses the most valuable asset a startup business can have is validated learning. Meaning you need to gain knowledge as quickly as possible to know whether you should pivot from or sustain the path your business is traveling on. If knowledge is our most expensive asset right now, then we are sitting on a freaking gold mine. We have learned so stinking much in the teensy three months that we’ve been farming.  Things that we thought wouldn’t go all that great have done exceedingly well and things we for sure thought would be a breeze have left us scratching our heads wondering where we went wrong in the process. And this whole farming thing isn’t a process where you can retrace your steps and fix what you did wrong in the beginning and then proceed.  You figure out two months into it where you messed up, take some notes on it, drop a couple of swear words, and then …

Another Year Older

Our chicks are fed, our freshly planted seedlings are watered, our lawn is mowed, our ears/noses/eyes/teeth are full of fine, windblown soil, and our hearts are full after a busy weekend. I turn 32 tomorrow. When I turned 30 I had a hard time with it. It just seemed like a turning point, a spot where, if I allowed it to pass, I couldn’t get back to the way I was before. It came and went, though, and ultimately didn’t matter all that much. A few months later, my son was born, and being slightly scared of getting older seemed like a ridiculous thing to worry about at that point. Children have a way of making you feel simultaneously young and old all at the same time. This year, I didn’t particularly feel like celebrating. We surely have lots of things to celebrate around here, but my birthday just didn’t feel like one of them. Instead, I’ve been trying to immerse myself in the various projects that need to get done around the farm. None …

Mother’s Day

Thanks to all the moms who have helped us become who we are today.  We’re thankful to you and to mother nature, who is turning our farm into a prolific little hilltop.    

Bring on the Rain

We, as they say on the streets, have hauled major ass this weekend.  We have the most amazing family and couldn’t have done what needed to get done without them.  Chris’s dad came on Friday and Saturday to help the continual hoop house construction. We’re so close to getting the skin on, but we have to wait for perfect non-windy conditions and about 7 people to help us do it.  Anyone interested in some labor intensive, non-paid work? While Chris and his dad were installing Lexan on the south side of the hoop house, I started digging the raised beds in our field. I did about 60% of it with a shovel that was two feet too short.  Chris bought us a new shovel and dug out the rest in half the time it took me. While I was digging, we were talking about how neat it would be to find an arrowhead. Only to have Chris’s step-father look down and see one laying on top of the dirt the very next day. The craftsmanship of the …